Crop rotation- a centuries-long technique that civilizations have used to maximize their crops' production and make sure that their soil yields to what their population needs. Crop rotation techniques would vary on the societies and their demands. Some techniques, for example, would be done to achieve immediate results without meaning to continue using resources; other crop rotation plans would be made for longer periods of time for continuous crop production while protecting the resources used.

Basically, crop rotation works to ensure proper nutrients are available for plant growth and soil functions. It keeps your soil healthy and fertile, so plants can grow and produce big harvests year after year by changing the crops planted in each plot into the next season. It also helps to manage possible diseases and pests related to certain plant families and thus protect the crops from harm, by moving them to a different area.

In order to improve your farms’s well-being and your soil’s production, here we give you some basic crop rotation techniques to plan for your next harvest season:

  • To begin with, divide your crops into four basic categories: legumes, roots, fruits, and leaves. You can start sectioning your farm into four different areas, or beds where you will consecutively plant your crops and switch with each change of season.
  • Even if your farm is small or doesn't have enough space for providing different soil beds, separate the crops into the above-mentioned plant groups instead of giving separate beds for each species of plant. Though planting this way, might make it harder to stop the spread of diseases and pests between your crops, you will have to keep a closer eye on their growth in between rotations.
  • To begin the rotation, start with more nitrogen-inducing crops like legumes for added soil nutrients, followed by leaf or fruit crops in that now nitrogen infused area since they need it as a nutrient, then move in with the root crops. This type of planning can be good for small farms as a simple crop rotation system.
  • If you have a larger farm, it’s best to plan your crop rotation on plant families instead of on nutrient needs. This will help prevent diseases and pests from attacking the following crops that are planted in the same area that a previous crop attracted.
  • Some diseases that are left behind, though, will require longer crop rotations for them not to affect the following crop. So long-term crop rotation planning will be required to wait for the disease to leave the soil bed before it is used again.
  • Cover crops can protect your crops from certain types of pests and improve the soil quality at the same time. It reduces the pests that might affect the following crops, allowing them to grow while adding soil organic matter content, improving the soil's duration.
  • If there is a certain crop group that you don't normally plant or use much of, the area left behind, if you follow the plant group rotation, is called a fallow bed. The fallow bed can be left empty for the soil to replenish itself and rest. You can also plant cover crops for fallow beds to help improve the soil’s fertility and its drainage capabilities.

Keeping the soil's effectiveness through crop rotation maintains its functions without stripping it of its nutrients. In this way, crop rotation has maintained its usefulness throughout the centuries, becoming both a timeless and innovative way of generating a constant food supply. And with the harvest you helped to create through these techniques, you’re ensuring good soil health and a constant crop growth no matter the season.

 

 

 

https://www.rodalesorganiclife.com/garden/crop-rotation-how-to

https://bonnieplants.com/2014/11/crop-rotation-made-easy/

http://www.bigag.com/topics/row-crop/crop-rotation-are-you-doing-it-right/

Crop rotation- a centuries-long technique that civilizations have used to maximize their crops' production and make sure that their soil yields to what their population needs. Crop rotation techniques would vary on the societies and their demands. Some techniques, for example, would be done to achieve immediate results without meaning to continue using resources; other crop rotation plans would be made for longer periods of time for continuous crop production while protecting the resources used.

Basically, crop rotation works to ensure proper nutrients are available for plant growth and soil functions. It keeps your soil healthy and fertile, so plants can grow and produce big harvests year after year by changing the crops planted in each plot into the next season. It also helps to manage possible diseases and pests related to certain plant families and thus protect the crops from harm, by moving them to a different area.

In order to improve your farms’s well-being and your soil’s production, here we give you some basic crop rotation techniques to plan for your next harvest season:

  • To begin with, divide your crops into four basic categories: legumes, roots, fruits, and leaves. You can start sectioning your farm into four different areas, or beds where you will consecutively plant your crops and switch with each change of season.
  • Even if your farm is small or doesn't have enough space for providing different soil beds, separate the crops into the above-mentioned plant groups instead of giving separate beds for each species of plant. Though planting this way, might make it harder to stop the spread of diseases and pests between your crops, you will have to keep a closer eye on their growth in between rotations.
  • To begin the rotation, start with more nitrogen-inducing crops like legumes for added soil nutrients, followed by leaf or fruit crops in that now nitrogen infused area since they need it as a nutrient, then move in with the root crops. This type of planning can be good for small farms as a simple crop rotation system.
  • If you have a larger farm, it’s best to plan your crop rotation on plant families instead of on nutrient needs. This will help prevent diseases and pests from attacking the following crops that are planted in the same area that a previous crop attracted.
  • Some diseases that are left behind, though, will require longer crop rotations for them not to affect the following crop. So long-term crop rotation planning will be required to wait for the disease to leave the soil bed before it is used again.
  • Cover crops can protect your crops from certain types of pests and improve the soil quality at the same time. It reduces the pests that might affect the following crops, allowing them to grow while adding soil organic matter content, improving the soil's duration.
  • If there is a certain crop group that you don't normally plant or use much of, the area left behind, if you follow the plant group rotation, is called a fallow bed. The fallow bed can be left empty for the soil to replenish itself and rest. You can also plant cover crops for fallow beds to help improve the soil’s fertility and its drainage capabilities.

Keeping the soil's effectiveness through crop rotation maintains its functions without stripping it of its nutrients. In this way, crop rotation has maintained its usefulness throughout the centuries, becoming both a timeless and innovative way of generating a constant food supply. And with the harvest you helped to create through these techniques, you’re ensuring good soil health and a constant crop growth no matter the season.

 

 

 

https://www.rodalesorganiclife.com/garden/crop-rotation-how-to

https://bonnieplants.com/2014/11/crop-rotation-made-easy/

http://www.bigag.com/topics/row-crop/crop-rotation-are-you-doing-it-right/